The Resumes That Bring In $400K+/Year (Samples Provided)

Ms 99to1percent

Blogging about Personal Finance along with a little touch of humor. Immigrant who started from the bottom and now I’m here…to tell my story, inspire and learn from others. Paid off $40K in student loans before graduating. CPA. Saved a $100K emergency fund in my 20’s. Hopping to pay off $500K+ mortgage within 5 years at 39. Hopping to become financially independent at 45. Happily married. Mom of 1.

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17 responses

  1. Having a good resume goes far! People don’t really take the time to read the cover letter in detail, but I still have one to show I’m a competent writer! And LinkedIn has definitely led to many recruiters contacting me, I haven’t taken them up on any of the interview offers, but it’s good to get feedback even when I’m not job hunting.

  2. Cubert says:

    Good tips! I know I should consider dusting off my resume and shooting for something that much bigger than my current situation, but with less than two years until FIRE, I’m pretty content to stay put, for now.
    For anyone else early-ish in career though, your advice is spot on. Just be sure to measure up to whatever you put on that resume, or you’ll find yourself in the doghouse pretty darn quick!

  3. I used to be a hiring manager and I will say that cover letters were very, very useful. In marketing/writing roles a cover letter was almost like a test of their skills for the job. While I don’t think people should customize their resume for each job, a cover letter should be customized.

    • Nowdays, most writers have a professional website that showcases their work. Wouldn’t it be more efficient to add the link to the resume instead of having to customize the cover letter every time you apply?

  4. Geeting in the door is the hardest part of getting a new job. Your resume is the key to the lock. Thanks for sharing your templates!

  5. Resume matters a lot. Thanks a lot for the information. I’ll keep it in mind next time when I look for a job.

  6. The two pieces of advice I can give is always collect feedback on why you were not hired if you don’t make the cut. And two review your resume regularly for gaps in experience to where you want to go. Take both and work on them even when not applying. These days I tend to be viewed as over qualified more then under because I worked hard to close those gaps.

  7. Awesome tips here! Thanks for the detailed explanation! I love that you point out that we don’t have to worry about cover letters or customization too! I think so many people try hard enough to put the effort into the actual resume since they focus more on the cover letter (ie. me LOL)

  8. Having a good resume is a big deal. Without that you are immediately not even considered. For the times I have had to use mine I can generally get an interview so I guess something is working.

    Thanks for sharing.

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